Category Archives: MI as Science

Building Better Teen Brains Tip #8

Get Real!

This is Brain Friendly tip #2 from Thomas Armstrong’s book, The Power of the Adolescent Brain. www.ASCD.org

Real-world experiences. Work activities engage higher-order thinking processes that are impacted by social and emotional influences…providing opportunities to develop executive functions…prefrontal cortex…

“…In real-world settings, adolescents are under optimal conditions for dealing with issues related to “hot” cognition, where on-the-spot behaviors and good decision making result in the formation of new neural connections between the emotional brain and the rational prefrontal cortex.. where life is unpredictable…with meaningful consequences.. that result from the choices we make…” (p.135)

Armstrong lists 6 ways that teachers can give students real world work experiences ….:

  1. Institute a job-shadowing program
  2. Provide internship experiences
  3. Create an apprenticeship program
  4. Establish a career academy
  5. Incorporate community-based learning and service learning
  6. Encourage entrepreneurial learning

Points to Ponder and Discuss:

  • Rate these suggestions from Best to Worst
  • Which idea(s) sound the most important or meaningful to you?
  • Which idea(s) are the most doable or feasible?
  • Which suggestion(s) are unrealistic or impossible to do?
  • If you had to choose one to do immediately, which one would you do and what would you have to do prepare to get started?

Do you have your own ideas for incorporating real world work experiences  into your subject area? What could help you to do more of this? Materials?

 

+++ www.ASCD.org

 

 

Building Better Teen Brains Tip #6

Thinking About Your Thinking!

This is Brain Friendly tip #2 from Thomas Armstrong’s book, The Power of the Adolescent Brain. www.ASCD.org

Metacognitive strategies. Executive control… maturation of the prefrontal and parietal lobes­­

“…abstract thought processes, self-reflection, thinking about long-term goals and social cognition…to rise above the concrete events of the world to confront and challenge their own emotionally charged and peer-influenced ways of thinking…activating executive functions”  such as goal setting, monitoring, evaluation and adjustment..(pgs. 35 and 109)

Armstrong lists 6 ways that teachers can give students opportunities to activate ….:

  1. Engage students in critical thinking
  2. Demonstrate use of metacognitive tools – organizers, heuristics, thinking journals

3.Help students learn goal-setting behaviors.

  1. Show students how to think clearly about their emotions
  2. Teach students how their brains work and why mindset is important
  3. Take students to the next level of existential thinking- philosophical reflections on life

Points to Ponder and Discuss:

  • Rate these suggestions from Best to Worst
  • Which idea(s) sound the most important or meaningful to you?
  • Which idea(s) are the most doable or feasible?
  • Which suggestion(s) are unrealistic or impossible to do?
  • If you had to choose one to do immediately, which one would you do and what would you have to do prepare to get started?

Do you have your own ideas for engaging students’ executive and critical thinking into your subject area? What could help you to do more of this? Materials?

++++www.ASCD.org

 

 

Build Better Teen Brains Tip #5

Move it!

This is Brain Friendly tip #2 from Thomas Armstrong’s book, The Power of the Adolescent Brain. www.ASCD.org

Learning through the body. Both large motor and fine motor skills coordinated by the cerebellum

.“…cerebellum plays a key role in movement…but also important in higher cognitive functions, such as language, executive function, and attention… take advantage of cerebellum’s neuroplasticity by engaging students in physical movements that are integrated directly with higher-order thinking skills…increase student engagement and academic achievement” (p. 34 and 96)

Armstrong lists 4 ways that teachers can give students opportunities to move while they are learning:

  1. Provide exercise breaks during and between classes
  2. Integrate drama into the curriculum
  3. Use physical movement to each specific concepts
  4. Engage students in hands-on activities

Points to Ponder and Discuss:

  • Rate these suggestions from Best to Worst
  • Which idea(s) sound the most important or meaningful to you?
  • Which idea(s) are the most doable or feasible?
  • Which suggestion(s) are unrealistic or impossible to do?
  • If you had to choose one to do immediately, which one would you do and what would you have to do prepare to get started?

Do you have your own ideas for incorporating more movement into your subject area? What could help you to do more of this? Materials?

 

++++www.ASCD.org

 

 

Build Better Teen Brains Tip #4

Feeling It!

This is Brain Friendly tip #4 from Thomas Armstrong’s book, The Power of the Adolescent Brain. www.ASCD.org

Affective learning. The limbic system is in full throttle while the prefrontal executive functions are still developing.

“…engage a range of activities and strategies for bringing joy, zest, and laughter as well as acknowledgement of the darker emotions in the classroom…” (p.34)

Armstrong lists 6 ways that teachers can give students opportunities to engage their emotions meaningfully:

  1. Be emotionally supportive of your students
  2. Bring more emotional expression into your teaching style
  3. Integrate controversy into your lessons
  4. Inject more humor into the classroom
  5. Engage your students’ imagination
  6. Become more aware of adolescent culture

Points to Ponder and Discuss:

  • Rate these suggestions from Best to Worst
  • Which idea(s) sound the most important or meaningful to you?
  • Which idea(s) are the most doable or feasible?
  • Which suggestion(s) are unrealistic or impossible to do?
  • If you had to choose one to do immediately, which one would you do and what would you have to do prepare to get started?

Do you have your own ideas for engaging students’ emotions into your subject area? What could help you to do more of this? Materials?

++++++www.ASCD.org

 

Building Better Teen Brains Tip #3

The Power of Peers!

Peer learning connections. Social peer activities engage striatum and the dopamine reward centers of the brain associated with motivation.

For teens…  “individual identity seems to be tightly bound to their identification with friends, classmates, and other peers…peer teaching, cooperative learning, exchanging ideas” (p. 66)

Armstrong lists 7 ways that teachers can give students opportunities to connect content with peer interaction:

  1. Establish small learning communities
  2. Engage students in collaborative learning projects
  3. Incorporate peer teaching
  4. Establish a peer mentoring program
  5. Let peers critique one another’s work

6.Use peer mediation as part of a school discipline plan

7.Create classwide simulations around specific academic content

Points to Ponder and Discuss:

  • Rate these suggestions from Best to Worst
  • Which idea(s) sound the most important or meaningful to you?
  • Which idea(s) are the most doable or feasible?
  • Which suggestion(s) are unrealistic or impossible to do?
  • If you had to choose one to do immediately, which one would you do and what would you have to do prepare to get started?

Do you have your own ideas for peer engaged learning in your subject area? What could help you to do more of this? Materials?

 

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MIDAS in Romania

Romania_Validity

email: sanda.bordei@yahoo.com

 

Sanda Bordei has conducted research with the MIDAS in Romania for a number of years. He has found support for the validity of his Romanian translation for 12 – 14 year old students. This work is well aligned with the recent validity studies in Iran as well as numerous other validity studies around the world.

 

 

Sanda Bordei, (2015) MIDAS factor structure analysis for Romanian 12 – 14 year old students. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences. ScienceDirect.com

 

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At Harvard and MIT

imageI reviewed the MI and neuroscience project with Howard Gardner @ Harvard and John Gabrieli @ MIT.  It appears to be on the right  track. We discussed future possibilities and Next Steps as we shed more light on how each of the multiple intelligences move thru the brain.  Onward.   Branton

M.I.S.T. Project ~ You’re invited!

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MI in the Brain!

Multiple Intelligences as Scientific Theory

I have launched this project to investigate the neuroscientific bases for each of the 8 intelligences. This is a massive project that will take  a number of years and many cooperating investigators to accomplish.

Howard. Gardner and Michael Posner are advisers to this effort. I am thankful for their guidance. I find it too easy to get lost in the tangled web of those 100 billion neurons as reported in the neuroscience literature.

I am also grateful for a number of eager volunteers who are Harvard Graduate School of Education students or graduates. They bring enthusiasm for MI to this daunting task. We are beginning with a review of the neuroscience literature to see how well recent findings compare to what Dr. Gardner predicted more than 30 years ago.

You, too, can get involved in this exciting project!  learn more here…

http://mistgroup.wikispaces.com/

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